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NETFLIX TEES UP PGA TOUR DOCUMENTARY SERIES

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NETFLIX TEES UP PGA TOUR DOCUMENTARY SERIES

Netflix has linked up with the PGA TOUR and golf’s major championships for an immersive documentary series following the lives and stories of top professional golfers across a season of high-stakes competition.

For the first time ever, the PGA TOUR and the governing bodies that conduct men’s major championships — Augusta National Golf Club, the PGA of America, the USGA, and The R&A – will provide entry into the sport’s biggest events including THE PLAYERS Championship and season-ending FedExCup, as well as the four majors: the Masters Tournament, PGA Championship, U.S. Open Championship and The Open. With unprecedented access inside the ropes and behind the scenes, the series will capture the intensity of training, travel, victory, and defeat through the lens of a diverse group of players and their support teams.

Current PGA TOUR player commitments include (alphabetically): Abraham Ancer, Daniel Berger, Cameron Champ, Joel Dahmen, Tony Finau, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Tommy Fleetwood, Rickie Fowler, Sergio Garcia, Harry Higgs, Max Homa, Viktor Hovland, Dustin Johnson, Brooks Koepka, Collin Morikawa, Kevin Na, Mito Pereira, Ian Poulter, Xander Schauffele, Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas, and Bubba Watson. Additionally, the world’s #1-ranked amateur golfer, Keita Nakajima, will participate as he plays in the first major championships of his career.

“This partnership with Netflix presents the PGA TOUR and the four major championships an opportunity to tap into a completely new and diverse audience,”  said Rick Anderson, Chief Media Officer of the PGA TOUR. “This documentary will give fans an authentic look into the real lives of our athletes, and what it’s like to win — and lose — during a season on the PGA TOUR.”

“We are thrilled to bring golf’s leading organizations and players together for this first-of-its-kind partnership and unparalleled window into life on the Tour,” said Brandon Riegg, Netflix Vice President of Unscripted and Documentary Series. “Our members will love getting to know the players and personalities as well as the iconic venues along the way. Even the most devoted golf fans have never seen the sport quite like this.”

The series is produced by Vox Media Studios (Explained) and Box To Box Films (Formula 1: Drive to Survive). Executive producers are David Check (30 for 30, Four Days in October); Chad Mumm and Mark Olsen for Vox Media Studios; and James Gay-Rees and Paul Martin for Box to Box Films. Filming is underway now throughout 2022.


Source: pgatour.com

4 TIPS TO HIT A PERFECT BUMP-AND-RUN, ACCORDING TO DANIELLE KANG

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4 TIPS TO HIT A PERFECT BUMP-AND-RUN, ACCORDING TO DANIELLE KANG

Press conferences — particularly in golf — can get extremely mundane.

“Talk about the approach you hit on 14.”

“What were you thinking coming up 18 with the lead?”

*yawn*

Occasionally, however, pressers provide some content gold. Think well-served Dustin Johnson after a team event, or Rory McIlroy with just about anything. It’s must-see TV, and you hope that it never ends. Sometimes, you even learn a little something about how to play golf, too. That’s just what happened during Danielle Kang’s winner’s presser after last week’s LPGA opener.

Coming off the course after her first win in 17 months, Kang was in just the right mood to be a perfect interview subject — a combination of engaging and insightful. The first few questions from the media were run-of-the-mill snoozers, but then, a question came in that really got her rolling.

“I think the one that may have brought a tear on the old-timers’ eyes was the bump-and-run today on 15. You just don’t see that shot very much anymore. Can you walk us through what your thinking is there?“

Luckily, Kang obliged, and we got a step-by-step breakdown on how to hit a proper bump-and-run:

1. Stand the shaft up To execute the shot to perfection, as Kang did, you need to make the shaft a bit more vertical than you would on a typical greenside shot.

“I stand the shaft up, put the ball back, put the toe down, and I just hit it aggressively through the ball,” she said.

2. Ball in the back of the stance With the ball in the back of your stance, it’s easier to hit down on it and make ball-first contact.

3. Play it off the toe You want the ball to get on the ground quickly and roll towards the hole, so you don’t want to put much backspin on the ball. To get this topspin, Kang said she plays the ball towards the toe of the club.

“It comes off like a putt,” she said.

4. Stay aggressive Perhaps the most important aspect of hitting a good bump-and-run is to stay aggressive.

“You just can’t be afraid of it,” Kang said. “If you hesitate it’s going to duff or chunk or going to catch a little bit too much toe spin. But as along as you’re aggressive it’s always going come out with the nice topspin that you can create with your putter.”

Source: http://golf.com

MATSUYAMA CLOSED LIKE A SUPERSTAR

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Matsuyama grabbed his eighth career PGA Tour victory with a shocking eagle

Russell Henley shot 23 under at the 2022 Sony Open this week, finishing in the top three in the field in putting, iron play and strokes gained from tee to green … and somehow did not win. That’s because Hideki Matsuyama shot 63-63 on the weekend and hit the shot of the season on the first hole of a playoff for the eighth – and perhaps most exciting – win of his PGA Tour career.

Rewind to the turn in Sunday’s final round. Henley took a commanding five-stroke lead to the second nine. Data Golf said his chances of winning at that moment were about 97%. It was not a foregone conclusion because nothing in golf is a foregone conclusion, but as far as sure bets go, it was up there.

Henley played the next nine holes in 1 over after touching the edge of the cup with putts on two of the last three holes. Nothing fell. He’d torched the golf course for 63 straight holes with at least two birdies or eagles on every previous nine-hole stretch. He made none over the final nine. Matsuyama played them in 4 under, including a birdie at the 72nd hole, to tie the tournament at 23 under and send it into bonus holes.

In the playoff, Henley drove one into a bunker. After getting out of trouble but with work to do to make birdie at the par-5 finisher – which was also being used as the first hole of the playoff – Henley looked to be fighting an uphill battle. Matsuyama could control the tournament by finding the green and two-putting for birdie. So of course he blistered a 3-wood from 276 yards to 32 inches for eagle to win the event.

It will go down as one of the 10 best shots of the entire season.

For Henley, it was a dagger in what had otherwise been such a tremendous week. He was trying to bookend his 2013 victory at this tournament with another one, which would have been the fourth of his underrated career. He did everything right, but he still couldn’t close out the reigning Masters champion.

There was good reason for that, too. Matsuyama is obviously a menace from tee to green, and he was again this week at Waialae Country Club. But the bigger problem for Henley was that Matsuyama led the field in putting for the first time in his career. He gained nearly half of his strokes on the greens, which is always going to be a problem for everyone else.

For Matsuyama, it’s the latest addition to an underrated résumé that includes two WGC victories, a Memorial win, two Phoenix Opens, a Zozo Championship in his home country of Japan and that famous Masters triumph last April. He’s earned over $37 million in his career and has essentially been a top-10 player in the world for the last seven years.

It’s easy for Matsuyama to get a bit lost in the shuffle when Jon Rahm, Justin Thomas and Jordan Spieth are swiping headlines, but he’s accomplished all of this before the age of 30, which both goes unnoticed and should be celebrated more than it is. This win ties him with K.J. Choi for the most all-time by an Asian-born player (8). Matsuyama has played just 203 official PGA Tour events, while Choi has played nearly 500 (though he won his eight in the first 300).

This was a terrific week for the PGA Tour, too. The week after the scoring record was reset at the Tournament of Champions, two perennially underrated golfers combined to shoot a best-ball 59 on Sunday with the tournament on the line, and the shot of the year was struck in a sleepy week with a below-average field. Another star built his narrative and his résumé with several big-time events just around the corner. If that’s what a mediocre weeks look like, imagine what the good ones are going to hold the rest of the year.

This is how it goes in golf, though. You never know when you’re going to see one of the great shots of the last few years. You never know when a run-of-the-mill golf tournament is going to deliver the finish of the season. You never know when the Masters champ is going to close like the superstar he is.

SOURCE: cbssports.com

THANKSGIVING BUFFET AT FOX RIDGE

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Let us do the cooking for you and your family this year on Thanksgiving. We have a Thanksgiving Buffet with all of the traditional favorites planned from 11 am – 5 pm on November 25, 2021. Spots will fill up fast so RSVP to secure your spot today. Call us at (319) 989-2213 by Monday, November 22, to make a reservation.

SEASON PASS DISCOUNTS NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 31

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Now’s the time to buy your 2022 season pass at Fox Ridge. We have several discounts for you to take advantage of when deciding on purchasing your season pass.

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